reptilefacts
markscherz:

birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.

#omg cute   #seriously though why don’t people teach this in school   #my tenured cell bio professor doesn’t know the difference   (via mothbug)
First - this is adorable and excellent, birdandmoon - as always! Second, I just wanted to address the question asked by Gina in her tags.
The reason many people don’t know about this is that it is a relatively new distinction. It is being self-enforced by the fairly logical nature of the terminology and a lot of particularly anal grammar Nazis. Indeed, most dictionaries do not give a satisfactory definition of venom vs. poison vs. toxin (as I basically explained in this post on the subject), and fifty years ago it was not as important, allowing for the publication of this jarringly titled book:

[x] - a copy of which resides in my office.
Another reason that this problem persists is that it is not universal. I dare say most languages do not make a distinction between venom and poison: as a fun game, go here and try different languages into which to translate ‘venom’, ‘poison’, and ‘toxin’. Of the several I tried, only Irish, French, English, and, curiously, Hebrew and Armenian, made any distinction.
Nevertheless, I believe the distinction of venom and poison to be a very important advancement of the English language, particularly with regard to science.

markscherz:

birdandmoon:

Venomous vs poisonous! The animals are: northern copperhead, cane toad, tiger keelback snake, hooded pitohui, northern short-tailed shrew.

#omg cute   #seriously though why don’t people teach this in school   #my tenured cell bio professor doesn’t know the difference   (via mothbug)

First - this is adorable and excellent, birdandmoon - as always! Second, I just wanted to address the question asked by Gina in her tags.

The reason many people don’t know about this is that it is a relatively new distinction. It is being self-enforced by the fairly logical nature of the terminology and a lot of particularly anal grammar Nazis. Indeed, most dictionaries do not give a satisfactory definition of venom vs. poison vs. toxin (as I basically explained in this post on the subject), and fifty years ago it was not as important, allowing for the publication of this jarringly titled book:

Poisonous snakes of the world

[x] - a copy of which resides in my office.

Another reason that this problem persists is that it is not universal. I dare say most languages do not make a distinction between venom and poison: as a fun game, go here and try different languages into which to translate ‘venom’, ‘poison’, and ‘toxin’. Of the several I tried, only Irish, French, English, and, curiously, Hebrew and Armenian, made any distinction.

Nevertheless, I believe the distinction of venom and poison to be a very important advancement of the English language, particularly with regard to science.

realmadrid-cf

rubysrocket:

Every WOSO fan, In fact every fan of soccer in general should go watch this mini documentary on women’s football in brazil. As the world cup approaches, women see themselves used as sexual objects to promote the mens game and when they want to actually play, they are teased, ostracized and sometimes even threatened. For those men who have ridiculed the women’s game or fed into sexist stereotypes in football, listen, learn, do better. Fighting Brazil’s Sexist Football Culture. 

instagram

instagram:

Weekend Hashtag Project: #WHPtransparent

Weekend Hashtag Project is a series featuring designated themes & hashtags chosen by Instagram’s Community Team. For a chance to be featured on the Instagram blog, follow @instagram and look for a post announcing the weekend’s project every Friday.

This weekend’s tag was #WHPtransparent, which asked participants to take creative photos of—and through—transparent objects. Every Monday we feature some of our favorite submissions from the project, but be sure to check out the rest here.